Biomimicry in Action

Why don’t woodpeckers get concussions?

Weekend before last, the nation enjoyed that great American institution, the Super Bowl, which our friend Kasey observed by getting her own minor concussion during a unscheduled encounter with a marble breakfast bar. In fact, she wasn’t even watching the game, but lacing up her shoes to hike Nevada’s Red Rock Canyon. Her injury, however is one that football players both young […]

By |February 9th, 2015|Biomimicry in Action, Birds, Shark Bites|Comments Off on Why don’t woodpeckers get concussions?

The Beginner’s Guide to … Fibonacci

My wife Francesca has suggested that I’m a Bookaholic, but I think that’s a bit extreme. (I can quit anytime I want to …) I do have a lot of books and keep multiple copies of certain favorites so that I can share them with people I meet who I think would enjoy the content. Janine’s book, Biomimicry,  is in this group—I […]

By |December 8th, 2014|Biomimicry in Action, Flowers and plants, Shark Bites|Comments Off on The Beginner’s Guide to … Fibonacci

More with mycologist Paul Stamets

Last blog I introduced my favorite mycologist, Paul Stamets with some excerpts from The Shark’s Paintbrush. Here’s more from that conversation …

I asked why nature would need to make mushrooms so toxic, and he gave a sensible answer. “Just because mushrooms can be highly toxic to humans, that doesn’t mean they’re harmful to their natural environment. They’re highly evolved, so the chemicals involved […]

By |November 10th, 2014|Biomimicry in Action|Comments Off on More with mycologist Paul Stamets

In praise of a fascinating fungi-phile

In my last blog, I shared some content from The Shark’s Paintbrush about fungi—now let me introduce you to the remarkable mycologist who shared his knowledge of these underappreciated organisms.

Paul Stamets is a colorful, bearded, man of the forest. The first time I met him he was wearing a dapper felt hat—that turned out to be made from mushroom fiber. This deeply knowledgeable, passionate […]

By |October 13th, 2014|Biomimicry in Action, Shark Bites, Uncategorized|Comments Off on In praise of a fascinating fungi-phile

What’s that on your face? Bio-inspiration and safe cosmetics

It’s surprising how cavalier we humans can be about our own safety.  Many of the products we use daily on our bodies include chemicals that are known to be toxic or carcinogenic. As the Campaign for Safe Cosmetics  (a coalition working under the aegis of the Breast Cancer Fund) points out, we’re not just talking about things like lipstick.  Shampoo, […]

By |August 25th, 2014|Biomimicry in Action, Shark Bites|Comments Off on What’s that on your face? Bio-inspiration and safe cosmetics

Young Biomimics

It’s so inspiring to see young people addressing the challenges and opportunities of designing cleaner, more sustainable products and technologies—nowhere more so than with the Biomimicry Student Design Challenge. Facilitated by the Biomimicry 3.8 Institute, the Challenge aims to promote the exploration of innovative, bio-inspired designs among college students. The challenge topic is announced in the fall, giving students nearly […]

By |July 14th, 2014|Biomimicry in Action, Shark Bites, Technology|Comments Off on Young Biomimics

Out and about

It’s shaping up to be a busy summer! I’m heading to Australia at the end of July to visit my hometown of Perth, and also to speak at the Colourways Trend Workshop in St. Kilda.  Back to California for a week and then off to the Ashland Green and Wild festival, hosted by my publisher, White Cloud Press. This […]

By |June 23rd, 2014|Biomimicry in Action, Shark Bites|Comments Off on Out and about

Shouldn’t be able to …

I ran across this article in an Australian publication, Business Insider, about the new “RoboClam, […]

By |May 12th, 2014|Biomimicry in Action, Sea life, Shark Bites, Technology|Comments Off on Shouldn’t be able to …

Heat, beat, and treat—or maybe not

Most of our environmental and economic problems result from an out–of–date way of doing business. Industry has continued to depend on the same old “heat, beat, and treat” methods that were mechanized in the industrial revolution, but these methods simply aren’t sustainable. Nature, on the other hand, constantly evolves, survives, and thrives, while not using up or endangering its base resources. It reinvents itself, […]

By |April 28th, 2014|Shark Bites, Technology|Comments Off on Heat, beat, and treat—or maybe not

Hidden in plain sight

I’m often fascinated by natural camouflage, and even included a bit about it in the book:

Sunflower and beeNature is also the true master of camouflage. From the almost invisible stone flounder and octopus to the snow fox, leafy sea dragon, and praying mantis, stealth is the difference between life and death. Unless mating, nature’s creatures do not like […]

By |April 7th, 2014|Animals, Biomimicry in Action, Shark Bites|Comments Off on Hidden in plain sight